Heroic Tourism did it for the dolphins!

by Jessie Panazzolo

Heroic Tourism, a local Adelaide conservation venture run by Jessie Panazzolo and Shannon Moulds, was proud to focus its first event in 2018 on the plight of dolphins in the tourism industry.

Since 2014, Heroic Tourism has been running as a global initiative to promote positive ethical alternatives to detrimental tourist ventures for wildlife. The event featured a screening on 7 March 2018 of The Cove, about Ric O’Barry’s investigation into the dolphin industry and the impacts that capturing dolphins has on captive individuals, wild populations and the health of Japanese citizens. After the screening, we held a discussion to find out how much the attendees knew about dolphins in tourism, what shocked them and what they had learned from the event.

dolphins

Here are some reactions:

It’s important to see these things even if you know about the situation, to truly understand the enormity and make that emotional/cognitive connection. Humans (the ones in power) are motivated by greed and have an incredible amount of cognitive dissonance and or willful ignorance. You’re either an activist or an in-activist.

That dude’s persistence to make a change- proved to me that individuals can make a difference. Also how much exposure and understanding can impact an issue – we all need to share as much info as we possibly can!

I had no idea about how dolphins were being treated and mass murdered for no reason. Like I was aware that, yes, captive animals have a lower quality of life compared to wild animals in their natural environment, but I assumed that places like SeaWorld took care of its animals. Now I wonder how many other animal related attractions take terrible care of their animals!

After watching the documentary, 100% of attendees said that they cared more about dolphins in the tourism industry and 78% of people said that since the event they are more inclined to see animals in the wild rather than in tourist facilities.

On Saturday 10 March 2018 we hosted an excursion to swim with Adelaide dolphins on the Temptation sailing boat. We saw two species of dolphins, the local residents, Bottlenose Dolphins as well as the migratory Common Dolphin. It was shocking to hear that Bottlenose Dolphins can live up to 60 years in the wild, but only live up to five years in captivity which just goes to show that being a tourism hero can add 55 years to a dolphin’s life!

29028071_758886560979860_7651020377061064704_n28872672_758886497646533_6145631329040990208_n

If you want to get involved with Heroic Tourism and our future events, please check our website www.heroictourism.com or our Facebook page for updates. Our next event, Education for Elephants on 20 April 2018, in aid of SA Youth Week, will focus on elephants in the tourism industry.

Thank you to Sustainable Communities for supporting this event and we look forward to working with them and a brand new lot of Tourism Heroes in future!

 

 

Advertisements

Aldinga Arts Ecovillage Open Day

Aldinga Arts Eco Village is holding an Open Day – 10am to 4pm Sunday 5 November 2017

Open Day images

Building on this 34 hectare village began in 2002 on what was a degraded and barren horse agistment property. Since then the land has slowly been regenerated and is currently home to over 300 people living in an assortment of low-energy dwellings along with shared orchards and open spaces.

Continue reading

For the love of trees

P1180870 (Medium)

The green canopy of these beautiful River Red Gums soften and enhance the suburban landscape in Victoria Avenue, but for how much longer we do not know. An application has been submitted to council for the removal of these trees.

Between a human and a tree is the breath. We are each other’s air.  –
Margaret Bates

 

There is a wild beauty in the statuesque older trees that thrust their limbs skyward above our suburban dwellings. These trees provide numerous benefits to humans for free and without any demands, except perhaps to be allowed to live. Sadly more and more of our big old trees are disappearing from suburban areas and in most places big tree species are no longer being planted. Undoubtedly this urban forest adds value and prestige to areas like Unley and if we don’t act now to halt the loss of trees, in a generation all our Adelaide suburbs will resemble stark concrete deserts. Yet most people fail to even notice the demise of these trees, some of which stood tall and proud before Europeans even set foot on this land.

Continue reading

Another call to preserve our heritage trees

by Anne Wharton on behalf of Save Unley Trees Campaign

Many residents in the Unley Council area are most concerned about the number of regulated and significant trees being removed from our suburbs, especially on private land. Indeed this seems to be happening throughout suburban Adelaide.

In Fairford Street, Unley there are 2 huge River Red Gums, possibly 100+ years old. The owners have recently submitted another application to Council to remove the western tree (their third application to cut down one or both of the trees).

20150529_073936_1 (Medium)

Photo taken 2 years ago before new house was built. The tree under application is the right hand tree (western), the bigger of the two, that is listed on the Unley Council’s Significant Tree List.

Continue reading